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Flies

North American plays host to more than 16,000 species of fly. One thing they have in common, though, is that all of them belong to the order Diptera which means they only have two wings. The house fly is the most common fly found in Kaukauna, WI homes accounting for nearly 90% of all fly infestations. House flies are typically 6-7mm long, have grey bodies with black lines, and have red eyes.

Fly infestations in Central Wisconsin can range from a minor nuisance to a major problem. Flies reproduce exceedingly fast with one pair of flies resulting in over a million new flies in a matter of weeks through their own mating and that of their offspring. Prevention is truly the key when it comes to fly infestations, and knowing the source of the flies is imperative to the success of eradication. The expert team at 1st Choice Pest Control will help you locate the source of the flies, identify the species, and appropriately treat both the pest and source to remove them and prevent their return. Our comprehensive fly control services will help avoid the numerous problems associated with fly infestations including the transmission of more than 65 diseases such as:

  • Cholera
  • E. Coli
  • Salmonella

Types of Flies

House Fly

House Fly

House flies are usually gray in appearance and display four black stripes on their thorax. Adult house flies are about 1/8-1/4” (4 to 7.5 mm) long. They have slightly hairy bodies, a single pair of wings, and compound red eyes, which contain thousands of individual lenses that allow them to have wider vision. Female house flies are usually larger than males. House flies do not have teeth or a stinger. House fly eggs resemble small grains of rice. The eggs hatch into larvae, also known as maggots, which range in size from about ¼-3/8” (7-10 mm) long. Maggots are cream-colored with a greasy appearance. When entering the pupal stage, maggots develop dark, hard outer shells, legs, and wings, ultimately emerging as full-grown adult flies.

Fruit Fly

Fruit Fly

Fruit flies are attracted to and eat rotting food. They especially like fruits and vegetables as well as fermenting liquids like beer, liquor, and wine. Fruit flies are also attracted to and sometimes breed in dark, moist, and unsanitary environments like drains, garbage disposals, and trash bins where rotting produce materials may collect. Because they reproduce very quickly, fruit fly extermination can be difficult. Female fruit flies can lay around 500 eggs, which can hatch in as little as 24 hours. Similar to other fly species, fruit flies have a four-stage life cycle, which can be completed in as little as a week in ideal conditions.

Drain Fly

Drain Fly

Drain flies are often associated with drains and are common at sewage treatment facilities. They are weak fliers and often appear to be jumping or hopping. Flight and mating activities normally occur in the evening hours when they are attracted to lights. Each female can produce around 100 eggs and under optimum conditions, development can be completed in about 2 weeks. Drain flies may be found around bathrooms or kitchen sinks. They are common around wet areas and can even breed in sink and bathroom drain traps, in spite of the hot water, soap, and other debris that flow through them.

Horse Fly

Horse Fly

Adult horse flies typically feed on nectar, but females require a blood meal before they can reproduce effectively. Female horse fly bites, especially in large specimens, can be quite painful because their mouthparts are used for tearing and lapping, as opposed to mosquitoes which simply pierce the skin and suck blood. Female horse flies are also persistent and will generally continue biting a host until they either succeed in procuring their blood meal or are killed. They are even known to chase their intended targets for short periods of time. Some species are vectors of disease organisms, but in the U.S., most horse fly-vectored diseases only involve livestock.

May Fly

May Fly

As mayflies are primarily an aquatic species, they spend most of their lives developing in the water. They are common around freshwater sources such as streams, lakes, or ponds. Mayflies are often seen as a sign of healthy water ecosystems because they are very sensitive to pollutants. They have relatively short life cycles. Females lay their eggs while flying low over the water or in the water directly, preferring clean, freshwater. Once the eggs hatch, these nymphs live near the bottom of the water, feeding on organic material. During this time as immature insects, fish and other insects will eat these nymphs. Once they mature, mayflies will leave the water, spending a day or two drying off and shedding their skin before flying away to mate. Males die after mating while females die after laying their eggs.